June 9, 2021 | by: Michelle Roy

How Food Brave are you?

How Food Brave are you?

Will you try anything food wise? Or do you stick to your regulars? I came across some interesting foods that people eat. I will not be trying any of them, but maybe you have? GROSS FOODS THAT PEOPLE ACTUALLY EAT:

➢ Hákarl:  It’s the national dish of Iceland. Essentially, it’s Greenland shark that’s been left to rot in the ground for several months. Next, it is hung to dry for a few months before serving. Why? Greenland shark flesh is poisonous before being given this treatment. (And it’s not AFTER??)
➢ Balut:  In the Philippines, some enjoy this dish of fertilized duck eggs with a partially developed embryo inside. After incubating for 2-3 weeks, they are boiled or steamed, before being served, usually with some kind of a sauce. And yes, some eggs contain partially-developed bones, which will be “firm but tender” after cooking.
➢ Milt:  Basically, it’s fish sperm. It’s consumed in Japan, Korea, Russia, Nordic countries, and the UK. Milt can be eaten fried or raw.
➢ Century Eggs:  In Asia, many enjoy chicken, duck, or quail eggs, placed into a mixture of clay, ash, salt, quicklime, and rice hulls. After curing for a few months, they come out looking pretty funky: The yolk turns into a greenish-gray mass, while the white becomes a brown, translucent jelly. They have an intense salty flavor.
➢ (***Caution***) Rocky Mountain Oysters:  Yup. Bull testicles, skinned and pounded flat. They’re given a nice coating of flour, salt and pepper, before being deep-fried and served. (And yes, several towns hold “testicle festivals”!)
➢ Casu Martzu:  It’s a Sardinian fermented sheep’s milk cheese. Actually, more like cheese that has entered a state of decomposition. And that’s not all. Don’t forget the maggots. Casu martzu is infested with fly larvae that you’re supposed to eat with it. Don’t let the maggots leap out of the cheese — and you want the maggots alive, because if they’re dead, Sardinians will tell you that the cheese is no longer edible.