June 7, 2021 | by: Michelle Roy

Fancy words Smart people use in regular conversation

Fancy words Smart people use in regular conversation

If you’re like me, sometimes I like to act smarter than I am. The ruse is up pretty quickly when I mispronounce things like a vanilla envelope (manilla) and mix mash (mishmash). I came across some words that sound fancy when describing pretty simple situations or people.

Perfunctory:  It sounds smart but it means someone was careless. It can be used to describe an action taken that was sloppy, rushed or badly done.
⇒ Vitriol:  A word used when feedback is horrendous, often seen as cruel and bitter criticism. (Oh, like a Twitter comment!)
⇒ Quid pro quo:  Latin. Yes. Pretentious. Probably. But the phrase, meaning “something for something,” does tend to make you sound smart.
⇒ Fait accompli:  This one is French, meaning something that is complete before anyone has a say in the outcome. (Somehow, “Done deal” doesn’t sound quite as intelligent…)
⇒ Umbrage:  If you think the word “offense” is overused these days, try this one instead. It means the same thing, but sounds way more dignified. (No offense…)
⇒ Ubiquitous:  It means something that is literally everywhere. If something is ubiquitous, then everybody knows about it. Like the iPhone. (And crooked politicians…)
⇒ Gregarious:  Use this word instead of calling someone a “people person” or an extrovert. (Who just popped into your head? THAT person is gregarious!)
⇒ Draconian:  If something is draconian, it is super harsh or severe, usually in reference to laws or regulations.  (Also used in reference to job cuts, unfortunately…)